10-MIT Storytelling: A technique for storytelling in presentations

Presentations & Public Speaking

crispy-presentations
  • 11.10.14 Keane at CrispyPresentations.com Brought to you by: 10-MIT Storytelling A quick and easy way to ensure a succinct story in your presentations.
  • We often hear that presentations should have a good story.
  • The tricky part is getting your story to be clear and concise.
  • So how can you avoid beating around the bush?
  • 10-MIT Storytelling: The 10 Most Important Things Write down, in order, the 10 most important things you want to tell your audience. These 10 things become short headlines on each of your slides. You can expand and contract from there – but keep it clear and concise. Remember: like any good story, it should have a beginning, middle and an end. Your beginning should set the stage with a question or challenge that you’ll be answering. Your middle is the meat of your presentations and by the time your reach your end, no one should be confused by your conclusions. Your ending wraps everything up in a nice bow. Also, don’t leave the audience hanging with what should come next.
  • Example: A (fake) research report about the Brown Pelican.
  • 7 Example: A research report. Let’s create a 10-MIT for a fictitious research report on Brown Pelicans. 1)  Set the stage 2)  Pose a problem 3)  What we did to solve it 4)  There’s four things we found out 5)  Finding 1 6)  Finding 2 7)  Finding 3 8)  Finding 4 9)  Here’s what all of those things mean for you and your business 10)  Based on this information, here’s what needs to happen next
  • 8 Example: A research report. Let’s create a 10-MIT for a fictitious research report on Brown Pelicans. 1)  Set the stage 2)  Pose a problem 3)  What we did to solve it 4)  There’s four things we found out 5)  Finding 1 6)  Finding 2 7)  Finding 3 8)  Finding 4 9)  Here’s what all of those things mean for you and your business 10)  Based on this information, here’s what needs to happen next “We’re here today to talk about a field study conducted on the Brown Pelican and their diet.”
  • 9 Example: A research report. Let’s create a 10-MIT for a fictitious research report on Brown Pelicans. 1)  Set the stage 2)  Pose a problem 3)  What we did to solve it 4)  There’s four things we found out 5)  Finding 1 6)  Finding 2 7)  Finding 3 8)  Finding 4 9)  Here’s what all of those things mean for you and your business 10)  Based on this information, here’s what needs to happen next “We set out to find out whether or not Brown Pelicans prefer fish tacos or fish and chips.” + + or
  • 10 Example: A research report. Let’s create a 10-MIT for a fictitious research report on Brown Pelicans. 1)  Set the stage 2)  Pose a problem 3)  What we did to solve it 4)  There’s four things we found out 5)  Finding 1 6)  Finding 2 7)  Finding 3 8)  Finding 4 9)  Here’s what all of those things mean for you and your business 10)  Based on this information, here’s what needs to happen next “So we followed pelicans around for 4 years and studied their eating habits.”
  • 11 Example: A research report. Let’s create a 10-MIT for a fictitious research report on Brown Pelicans. 1)  Set the stage 2)  Pose a problem 3)  What we did to solve it 4)  There’s four things we found out 5)  Finding 1 6)  Finding 2 7)  Finding 3 8)  Finding 4 9)  Here’s what all of those things mean for you and your business 10)  Based on this information, here’s what needs to happen next “We found that pelicans far prefer fish tacos, but this comes with several caveats.” + ✓ ✓
  • 12 Example: A research report. Let’s create a 10-MIT for a fictitious research report on Brown Pelicans. 1)  Set the stage 2)  Pose a problem 3)  What we did to solve it 4)  There’s four things we found out 5)  Finding 1 6)  Finding 2 7)  Finding 3 8)  Finding 4 9)  Here’s what all of those things mean for you and your business 10)  Based on this information, here’s what needs to happen next “Most pelicans prefer fish tacos to fish and chips.” “Nearly all fish tacos consumed by pelicans are accompanied by a lime wedge.” “The only time pelicans eat fish and chips is at Irish pubs.” “Pelicans only prefer fish taco joints that are top rated on Yelp.”
  • 13 Example: A research report. Let’s create a 10-MIT for a fictitious research report on Brown Pelicans. 1)  Set the stage 2)  Pose a problem 3)  What we did to solve it 4)  There’s four things we found out 5)  Finding 1 6)  Finding 2 7)  Finding 3 8)  Finding 4 9)  Here’s what all of those things mean for you and your business 10)  Based on this information, here’s what needs to happen next “If you’re going to sell to pelicans, it should probably be fish tacos.” “When selling fish tacos, ensure that you have lime wedges to compliment.” “There aren’t that many Irish pubs near pelicans, so that rules out fish and chips.” “Ensure that your fish taco joint has high ratings on Yelp. Consider using pelican influencers.”
  • 14 Example: A research report. Let’s create a 10-MIT for a fictitious research report on Brown Pelicans. 1)  Set the stage 2)  Pose a problem 3)  What we did to solve it 4)  There’s four things we found out 5)  Finding 1 6)  Finding 2 7)  Finding 3 8)  Finding 4 9)  Here’s what all of those things mean for you and your business 10)  Based on this information, here’s what needs to happen next “Next, we should confirm these learnings in a pelican focus group and then begin the communications planning process.”
  • While this was fictitious, you can see how clear and concise the story could be.
  • Lastly, the 10MIT technique works on nearly any type of story. Try it on your next presentation!
  • Thanks! Hopefully you learned something. http://crispypresentations.com By Crispy Presentations @CrispyTemplates – Twitter CrispyPresentations - Slideshare Like this template? Click here to buy it now.
  • 18 Attribution Images and assets used in this presentation. 1)  https://www.flickr.com/photos/cimere/3201190596/ 2)  https://www.flickr.com/photos/g-ratphotos/3352055289/ 3)  https:[email protected]/15606944816/ 4)  https://www.flickr.com/photos/dodogoeslr/2340175472/ 5)  https://www.flickr.com/photos/taylar/12218024886/ 6)  https://www.flickr.com/photos/sempivirens/3318198408/ 7)  https://www.flickr.com/photos/htakashi/10995863465/ 8)  Icons – http://thenounproject.com
Please download to view
18
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Description
We often hear that a presentation needs a good story.

But the tricky part is to get your story to be clear and concise.

So how can you avoid beating around the bush?

10-MIT Storytelling: The 10 Most Important Things you want to tell your audience.
Text
  • 11.10.14 Keane at CrispyPresentations.com Brought to you by: 10-MIT Storytelling A quick and easy way to ensure a succinct story in your presentations.
  • We often hear that presentations should have a good story.
  • The tricky part is getting your story to be clear and concise.
  • So how can you avoid beating around the bush?
  • 10-MIT Storytelling: The 10 Most Important Things Write down, in order, the 10 most important things you want to tell your audience. These 10 things become short headlines on each of your slides. You can expand and contract from there – but keep it clear and concise. Remember: like any good story, it should have a beginning, middle and an end. Your beginning should set the stage with a question or challenge that you’ll be answering. Your middle is the meat of your presentations and by the time your reach your end, no one should be confused by your conclusions. Your ending wraps everything up in a nice bow. Also, don’t leave the audience hanging with what should come next.
  • Example: A (fake) research report about the Brown Pelican.
  • 7 Example: A research report. Let’s create a 10-MIT for a fictitious research report on Brown Pelicans. 1)  Set the stage 2)  Pose a problem 3)  What we did to solve it 4)  There’s four things we found out 5)  Finding 1 6)  Finding 2 7)  Finding 3 8)  Finding 4 9)  Here’s what all of those things mean for you and your business 10)  Based on this information, here’s what needs to happen next
  • 8 Example: A research report. Let’s create a 10-MIT for a fictitious research report on Brown Pelicans. 1)  Set the stage 2)  Pose a problem 3)  What we did to solve it 4)  There’s four things we found out 5)  Finding 1 6)  Finding 2 7)  Finding 3 8)  Finding 4 9)  Here’s what all of those things mean for you and your business 10)  Based on this information, here’s what needs to happen next “We’re here today to talk about a field study conducted on the Brown Pelican and their diet.”
  • 9 Example: A research report. Let’s create a 10-MIT for a fictitious research report on Brown Pelicans. 1)  Set the stage 2)  Pose a problem 3)  What we did to solve it 4)  There’s four things we found out 5)  Finding 1 6)  Finding 2 7)  Finding 3 8)  Finding 4 9)  Here’s what all of those things mean for you and your business 10)  Based on this information, here’s what needs to happen next “We set out to find out whether or not Brown Pelicans prefer fish tacos or fish and chips.” + + or
  • 10 Example: A research report. Let’s create a 10-MIT for a fictitious research report on Brown Pelicans. 1)  Set the stage 2)  Pose a problem 3)  What we did to solve it 4)  There’s four things we found out 5)  Finding 1 6)  Finding 2 7)  Finding 3 8)  Finding 4 9)  Here’s what all of those things mean for you and your business 10)  Based on this information, here’s what needs to happen next “So we followed pelicans around for 4 years and studied their eating habits.”
  • 11 Example: A research report. Let’s create a 10-MIT for a fictitious research report on Brown Pelicans. 1)  Set the stage 2)  Pose a problem 3)  What we did to solve it 4)  There’s four things we found out 5)  Finding 1 6)  Finding 2 7)  Finding 3 8)  Finding 4 9)  Here’s what all of those things mean for you and your business 10)  Based on this information, here’s what needs to happen next “We found that pelicans far prefer fish tacos, but this comes with several caveats.” + ✓ ✓
  • 12 Example: A research report. Let’s create a 10-MIT for a fictitious research report on Brown Pelicans. 1)  Set the stage 2)  Pose a problem 3)  What we did to solve it 4)  There’s four things we found out 5)  Finding 1 6)  Finding 2 7)  Finding 3 8)  Finding 4 9)  Here’s what all of those things mean for you and your business 10)  Based on this information, here’s what needs to happen next “Most pelicans prefer fish tacos to fish and chips.” “Nearly all fish tacos consumed by pelicans are accompanied by a lime wedge.” “The only time pelicans eat fish and chips is at Irish pubs.” “Pelicans only prefer fish taco joints that are top rated on Yelp.”
  • 13 Example: A research report. Let’s create a 10-MIT for a fictitious research report on Brown Pelicans. 1)  Set the stage 2)  Pose a problem 3)  What we did to solve it 4)  There’s four things we found out 5)  Finding 1 6)  Finding 2 7)  Finding 3 8)  Finding 4 9)  Here’s what all of those things mean for you and your business 10)  Based on this information, here’s what needs to happen next “If you’re going to sell to pelicans, it should probably be fish tacos.” “When selling fish tacos, ensure that you have lime wedges to compliment.” “There aren’t that many Irish pubs near pelicans, so that rules out fish and chips.” “Ensure that your fish taco joint has high ratings on Yelp. Consider using pelican influencers.”
  • 14 Example: A research report. Let’s create a 10-MIT for a fictitious research report on Brown Pelicans. 1)  Set the stage 2)  Pose a problem 3)  What we did to solve it 4)  There’s four things we found out 5)  Finding 1 6)  Finding 2 7)  Finding 3 8)  Finding 4 9)  Here’s what all of those things mean for you and your business 10)  Based on this information, here’s what needs to happen next “Next, we should confirm these learnings in a pelican focus group and then begin the communications planning process.”
  • While this was fictitious, you can see how clear and concise the story could be.
  • Lastly, the 10MIT technique works on nearly any type of story. Try it on your next presentation!
  • Thanks! Hopefully you learned something. http://crispypresentations.com By Crispy Presentations @CrispyTemplates – Twitter CrispyPresentations - Slideshare Like this template? Click here to buy it now.
  • 18 Attribution Images and assets used in this presentation. 1)  https://www.flickr.com/photos/cimere/3201190596/ 2)  https://www.flickr.com/photos/g-ratphotos/3352055289/ 3)  https:[email protected]/15606944816/ 4)  https://www.flickr.com/photos/dodogoeslr/2340175472/ 5)  https://www.flickr.com/photos/taylar/12218024886/ 6)  https://www.flickr.com/photos/sempivirens/3318198408/ 7)  https://www.flickr.com/photos/htakashi/10995863465/ 8)  Icons – http://thenounproject.com
Comments
Top